Vermont Reads Institute at UVM
Coming Events

September 17
Coaches as Learners – Effective Literacy Coaching within MTSS-RtII

September 24
Coaches as Partners – Effective Literacy Coaching within MTSS-RtII

October 15
The What, Why and How of Reading Interventions in Grades 3-6

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Welcome

The Vermont Reads Institute at the University of Vermont (VRI at UVM) conducts high-quality professional development and research in all areas of literacy. Working in partnership with state agencies and universities, we are dedicated to supporting school improvement and to serving all educators and children in Vermont.  In our literacy reform effort, we strive to enhance teacher and administrator knowledge and expertise, promote teacher reflection and decision-making, and help schools create conditions necessary for all children to enjoy high levels of achievement.

VRI at UVM offer four distinct projects; the Literacy Leadership Initiative (Gr. K-12), Bridging Project (Gr. 3-6),  Vermont Adolescent Literacy & Learning Initiative (Gr. 6-12), and Summer Institute (Gr. K-12).

Welcome


The Vermont Reads Institute at the University of Vermont (VRI at UVM) conducts high-quality professional development and research in all areas of literacy. Working in partnership with state agencies and universities, we are dedicated to supporting school improvement and to serving all educators and children in Vermont.  In our literacy reform effort, we strive to enhance teacher and administrator knowledge and expertise, promote teacher reflection and decision-making, and help schools create conditions necessary for all children to enjoy high levels of achievement.

VRI at UVM offer four distinct projects; the Literacy Leadership Initiative (Gr. K-12), Bridging Project (Gr. 3-6),  Vermont Adolescent Literacy & Learning Initiative (Gr. 6-12), and Summer Institute (Gr. K-12).

Blog


February 5, 2016

Losing the “Rattomorophic” View of Learning


In ReLeah Cossett Lent’s introduction of her new book, This is Disciplinary Literacy, she writes about a student in one of her courses sharing about how “American schools have been functioning with a “rattomorophic” view of a learner as a being that can be taught mechanically and interchangeably” (2015). In today’s 21st century world with a focus on communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration across the many disciplines, this view can no longer be true. In the graduate course I teach, where we are using Lent’s text as a focus for our work, two  teachers […]

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